Monday, December 18, 2017

Photography Lessons for beginners using Canon DSLR's, Advice I wish people had told me before I started.


Buy the best quality lens you can afford.
I recommend a 24mm to 105mm Canon Series L lens.
It's a good walk around lens with quality glass.
 It's not too heavy and obtrusive.
Don't listen to people who say; you don't have to have good lenses to take good photos.




Buy a canon 100 cm macro lens. I have a Sigma 50mm.
 It is cheaper than a Canon 100mm.
The disadvantage of it is that if you get up  too close to your subject you caste a shadow onto it.
A canon 100mm lens would allow you to get a close up shot from further away so you are not casting a shadow or even touching your subject.


It's often about the light.
The best light is in the morning at dusk and in the evening around  sunset.
 The golden hours.
 The light is too flat in the middle of the day; especially for landscapes; don't bother.



Make a folder early on called best photos and start filing the ones you like away so you can enter competitions or put them on your blog or have an exhibition.
 Or just look at them for inspiration.
You will know when you have taken a photo you like.
 Keep it.



It's good to keep your settings on AV.
 Lots of professional photographers do this.
It's less complicated than manual; especially at the start.






One thing I did correctly  from the start; was to join the  Rotorua Camera Club.
And to persevere with it,  through thick and thin.
It made me take a lot more photographs and it allowed me to view a lot of award winning photographs.
Some of the critiquing can be a bit harsh and unhelpful at times and some of the award winning photographs can seem a bit on the boring side to an artist.
But I went on a lot of workshops and slowly; so incredibly slowly; I got better.


I think its a good idea to join Viewbug because all of the photographers and organisers are very positive.
People award your photos and give them likes and this can be helpful when you are looking at  things from a popularity aspect.
There are lots of  really good photographers on there and you have a chance to vote for their photos, follow them and give and receive  awards.
Collecting points can be addictive.


 This is my latest thing.


Making natural subjects like seagulls appear quite unnatural, surreal  and a little sinister.
 

I love creating photographs that no-one else has.
Photographs that sometimes tell a story or ask questions to me are arresting.

I love photography and I love teaching beginners.

Phone 0273513887
Email janet@jkeen.net  for private tutoring enquiries.


 


 

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